Keeping the SCCM Cache Clean with DCM

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SCCM Cache

SCCM Cache Clean

In environments with frequent software distributions the SCCM cache folder can quickly take up large amounts of disk space.  This really becomes problematic on older systems or virtual machines with limited amounts of disk space.  Our support team found themselves having to constantly track down systems with low disk space and clean the cache.  I came up with this DCM configuration item to automatically detect and cleanup content in the cache which is older than the given number of days.  The detection and cleanup scripts both write to their own application event logs so you can see a history of cleanup activities.

Creating the CI

Create a new configuration item and select Windows Desktops and Servers as the type of configuration item.

Choose the appropriate operating systems.  In my case I selected all operating systems as I wanted the cache to be cleaned across the board.

Create a new setting and set it’s type to script and data type to string.

Add a discovery script for detecting old items in the cache folder.  Customize the number of days as you see fit.  You can also modify the event log source if desired.

$MinDays = 30

New-EventLog -LogName SCCM_Cleanup -Source "DCM" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
Write-EventLog -LogName SCCM_Cleanup -Source "DCM" -EntryType Information -EventId 1000 -Message "Detection starting for Cleanup CCMCACHE" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

$UIResourceMgr = New-Object -ComObject UIResource.UIResourceMgr
$Cache = $UIResourceMgr.GetCacheInfo()
$count = ($Cache.GetCacheElements() | where-object {[datetime]$_.LastReferenceTime -lt (get-date).adddays(-$mindays)} | Measure-object).Count

Write-EventLog -LogName SCCM_Cleanup -Source "DCM" -EntryType Information -EventId 1003 -Message "Total obsolete items found: $count" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
Write-EventLog -LogName SCCM_Cleanup -Source "DCM" -EntryType Information -EventId 1001 -Message "Detection ending for Cleanup CCMCACHE" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

$count

Next, define a remediation script.  Once again you can customize the number of days and event log name.  The number of days should match your detection script.

$MinDays = 30

New-EventLog -LogName SCCM_Cleanup -Source "DCM" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
Write-EventLog -LogName SCCM_Cleanup -Source "DCM" -EntryType Information -EventId 1010 -Message "Remediation starting for Cleanup CCMCACHE" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

$UIResourceMgr = New-Object -ComObject UIResource.UIResourceMgr
$Cache = $UIResourceMgr.GetCacheInfo()
$Cache.GetCacheElements() | where-object {[datetime]$_.LastReferenceTime -lt (get-date).adddays(-$mindays)} | foreach { $Cache.DeleteCacheElement($_.CacheElementID) }

Write-EventLog -LogName SCCM_Cleanup -Source "DCM" -EntryType Information -EventId 1011 -Message "Remediation ending for Cleanup CCMCACHE" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

The final step is to create your compliance rule.  Set the value to check against to 0 and check the run remediation script checkbox.

Now after you test the new CI assign it to the appropriate baseline(s) for your environment.  Now you can forget about having to manually cleanup the SCCM cache folder ever again.

 

ALSO CHECK : Have you heard about Get-WQLObject?

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