Working with CSV Files

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Hey everyone, it’s been a little while since my last post, but work’s been busy.  A recurring issue I see on TechNet is that plenty of people have trouble working with importing/exporting CSV files.  Specifically, I see questions about how to modify CSV files. Personally, I don’t see any value in modifying the CSV file directly, but rather importing the data from said file and working with the dataset natively in PowerShell.  Using one person’s thread as an example, he had a CSV file full of IP addresses that corresponded to his VM’s.  He wanted to add data about the VM based on the IP address, but wanted to know how to “modify the line” in the CSV file.    He had already written part of the script to create the CSV by pinging each computer in his IP range and outputting that to CSV.  For our test, here’s what our CSV looks like:

Now, let’s say we want to find the hostnames for each of these computers and add that to a new column. There are a couple ways we could do this, but in an enterprise environment, a good way to do it is to just ask AD who it is.   First, we create the empty “column” for our Hostname value.

Once that’s created, we need to fill it with values:

Keep in mind that you will see a lot of red text for any computer that doesn’t have an entry in AD. This could be a printer, a switch, etc.  If you’re using Windows 8.1+ or Server 2012R2+, you can use the resolve-dnsname cmdlet. 
You can add more columns to the CSV by using the Add-Member cmdlet to your heart’s content, and when you’re done, you pipe your $dataset variable back to the export-csv cmdlet.   
Really, once you start looking at CSV files as arrays of custom objects, they’re pretty easy to work with.

Importing drivers into SCCM in bulk

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This is taken from my TechNet gallery here: https://goo.gl/n1QT89

     When you’re tasked with something like a Windows 10 upgrade, you’ll find yourself spending lots of time downloading and importing drivers into SCCM.   While this script won’t go out and download them for you (like the Dell and HP Driver Import tools I’ve seen out there), it manufacturer, model, and architecture agnostic, you don’t get caught up trying to negotiate your way past your firewall and proxy teams, and it runs in a bit under 50 lines of code (including comments). Rather than pasting in the entire thing, I’ll do a screenshot and walk through from there.

     For this script to work, there’s some groundwork required on your part. When you download the drivers, they need to be downloaded into a folder that has whatever name you want for your driver package later.  If you’re like me, you’re already doing this as you download. If I need drivers for an HP Z230 desktop, the folder they’re saved in is already called “HP Z230 Windows 10 x64” or something similar so I can find them later.  The way this script works, whatever your folders’ names are is what names your driver packages will end up with.
    Aside from that, all you need to do is plug in the path to the file share that has all your make/model folders in the root, as well as the location where you want to store your driver packages.
    Something you will notice in this script is that I bounce between my C: drive and my SCCM drive. This is because UNC paths don’t always work as expected when you’re on the SCCM drive, and SCCM cmdlets don’t play nice running from anything other than the SCCM drive.  To guarantee they both work when needed, I just switch between locations, and it’s no big deal. 
    This script can take a little while to run, but it will give you feedback as it goes, and it doesn’t lock you out of the SCCM GUI while it runs.

SCCM Powershell Tools

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I’ll get this out of the way right now: I think SCCM’s PowerShell module is garbage.  It’s slow, it doesn’t work like you’d expect a lot of the time, and it’s got absolutely nothing on the ease of use and functionality of something like the ActiveDirectory module.  Thankfully, WMI is still a thing, and that gives us an excellent way to interact with SCCM via PowerShell. With that in mind, here’s some quick and dirty (but still useful) PowerShell functions I’ve put together. Most, if not all, PowerShell tools I’ve written for SCCM can also be done with SQL queries and commands, so if that’s more your thing, have at.

Find-ClientByMac
File can be downloaded from my technet gallery here
This is a simple enough tool. It will find any clients in the SCCM database that match a “like” query against the MAC address you provide.  This is handy for finding duplicate objects with the same MAC, which can royally screw with trying to PXE boot and image a computer.

Function Find-ClientByMAC ($inputMac){
    $namespace = “root/SMS/Site_TST”
    $siteServer = “testServer”

    $inputMac = $inputMac.Replace(” “,””)
   $inputMac = $inputMac.replace(“-“,”:”)
   
    if ($inputMac -notlike “*:*”)
    {
        $count = 0
        while ($count -lt ($inputMac.Length – 2))
        {
            $inputMac = $inputMac.Insert(($count)+2,’:’)
            $count += 3
        }
        $inputMac
    }
    Get-WmiObject -Namespace $namespace -ComputerName $siteServer -class SMS_R_System -filter “MACAddresses like ‘%$inputMac%'”
 }


Something to keep in mind with SCCM is that it stores MAC addresses with “:” between each pair, but your computer’s IPConfig command will give it to you with “-“‘s.  This will replace a – with a :, and if you just feed it a straight set of text, it will insert the “:” between each pair.
This will find any computer that matches the MAC you provided and returns with a WMI object of the SMS_Device class.  If you want to delete the duplicate objects, you can simply pipe to the remove-wmiobject command to delete.