SSRS – Client Health Dashboard

, , , , ,
Client Health Dashboard
In previous posts I was speaking about soon to be releasing a series of SSRS reports based on troubleshooting. The first in the series I am trying to have is a focus on Client Health Overview. This dashboard will later be include drill down functionality to multiple other reports as soon as I can finish making and validating them. This dashboard is something that I put together for my current customer to get a brief overview of client health. There will be a few more items added to the home page at a later time which will be focused on count vulnerable/unpatched systems
Currently we can see in this report Active clients, MP information, Client version counts, OS version counts. There are even a few top level items you should keep an eye on like duplicate systems, mac addresses, systems running out of space, or why clients failed to install/re-evaluate. These will all be further expaneded on when the full client health troubleshooting series wraps up over the next few weeks.

Link to the Report: https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/SSRS-Client-Health-6bfb794f

Some code used from: Greg Ramsey and Eswor Koneti

Future Dashboards w/ drilldowns coming soon.

– Client Health (will be finished soon)

  • This will also include drill downs into several other reports

– Software Deployment (For Packages / For Apps)

  • This will also include how to troubleshoot just like this other report
– Infrastructure health (Primary/DP/SQL/DP etc health focused)
  • This will also include how to troubleshoot just like this other report
  • This will also include drill downs into several other reports
– Windows Migration Summary

 

– Collection evaluation

 

SCCM Power Plan SQL Queries

, , , ,

In one of my customers environments there was a request for a quick review of ConfigMgr Power Plan settings. This turned out to show us that there were over 20+ power plans in the environment and needed to be reduced. Below is the quick query I came up with for the customer.

— individual systems with power plans and collection they belong to
select
SMS_R_System.Name0 AS [System Name],
V_Collection.Name AS [Collection Name],
__R_MANAGEMENT_CONFIGURATION0.NonPeakPowerPlanName00 AS ‘Non Peak Power Plan Name’,
__R_MANAGEMENT_CONFIGURATION0.PeakPowerPlanName00,
__R_MANAGEMENT_CONFIGURATION0.PowerConfigID00 AS [Collection Power setting Source]
from
vSMS_R_System AS SMS_R_System
INNER JOIN POWER_MANAGEMENT_CONFIGURATION_DATA AS __R_MANAGEMENT_CONFIGURATION0 ON __R_MANAGEMENT_CONFIGURATION0.MachineID = SMS_R_System.ItemKey
Inner JOIN V_Collection on V_Collection.CollectionID = __R_MANAGEMENT_CONFIGURATION0.PowerConfigID00
Order by
SMS_R_System.Name0

 

— collections with count of systems with power plans
select
V_Collection.Name AS [Collection Name],
__R_MANAGEMENT_CONFIGURATION0.PowerConfigID00 AS [Collection Power setting Source],
count (V_Collection.Name) AS Count,
__R_MANAGEMENT_CONFIGURATION0.NonPeakPowerPlanName00 AS ‘Non Peak Power Plan Name’,
__R_MANAGEMENT_CONFIGURATION0.PeakPowerPlanName00
from
vSMS_R_System AS SMS_R_System
INNER JOIN POWER_MANAGEMENT_CONFIGURATION_DATA AS __R_MANAGEMENT_CONFIGURATION0 ON __R_MANAGEMENT_CONFIGURATION0.MachineID = SMS_R_System.ItemKey
Inner JOIN V_Collection on V_Collection.CollectionID = __R_MANAGEMENT_CONFIGURATION0.PowerConfigID00
Group by
v_Collection.Name,
__R_MANAGEMENT_CONFIGURATION0.NonPeakPowerPlanName00,
__R_MANAGEMENT_CONFIGURATION0.PeakPowerPlanName00,
__R_MANAGEMENT_CONFIGURATION0.PowerConfigID00

 

In a future blog post I’ll drop a massive amount of sql queries you should find helpful in any environment.